Queer/Race

Gay Muslims

Posted in Uncategorized by thecasualsquirrel on May 7, 2010

*This counts for my “what we haven’t talked about” blog.  Even though I said that was my first one, that one was really a news article.

The name of this blog and class is queer/race.  However we have not talked about how being gay affects being part of a certain race.  Why haven’t we done this?  You would think we would have discussed it at least in depth once but we really haven’t.

I have recently seen a documentary on gay Muslims.  Their struggles of being accepted parallel many of those today however they have one problem that others do not.  Because of their race/religion they can be punished by death and this creates a huge dilemma.

In the States you may be exiled from family or house because of being gay but it is not legally acceptable for people to beat and kill you.  Although this still does occur in America it is not legal.  However for many gay Muslims being gay is like being marked for death.  It creates these immense internal struggles because they still want to be good Muslims but their religion denies them this ability.

I think this needs to be talked about because there are many races/religions (sometimes those are the same) that do not accept homosexuality as a fact.  The African American community has been viewed in the past and still is now somewhat hyper-homophobic.  Why are some races more opposed to this than others?

I really want some responses to this.  I know this is late in the semester but I feel like this is something that has to be said or talked about since this class is about race.  Also, everyone should watch this documentary because it is very informational and it shows how connected or unconnected race and queerness can be.

http://www.sundancechannel.com/films/500320095/

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2 Responses

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  1. anj316 said, on May 7, 2010 at 6:32 pm

    I don’t think I saw this documentary that you’re talking about, but there was this fabulous one on LOGO on queer muslims as well. And there was also another sort of documentary about a woman from Iran who was in exile because of her sexuality, and she went abroad to Poland, I think, and went around as a man because it was easier to get work, better pay, etc. My point with that is, yes, Islam is a very conservative religion, especially by those who interpret it that way.

    I was actually sad that we didn’t touch on more races and ethnicities this semester, because that’s what I thought this class would be about. It is important, I think, for issues like how religion/race/ethnicity/class effect and are affected by queerness and vice versa. I mean, society is one that is effected by intersections. And it’s always great to explore this. I’m watching the documentary right now,and it hits on a lot of the same points as the one I saw. I’m glad that there are at least people exploring this side of queerness. It shows that the world is at least opening up and examining things a little further.

    Thanks for this post.

  2. jshu10 said, on May 8, 2010 at 9:23 am

    I’m glad you brought this up because I also felt that we did not focus enough on specific queer/race intersections. On the other hand, I think what I have learned this semester is that we are always talking about race because race is constantly at work and at play in our thinking, in our interactions, and in our imaginations…(for better or for worse).perhaps it is beyond our maximum self vigilance to erase our racism because it works in such subtle ways.

    My paper for the class is significantly invested in looking at sexualities across borders, especially in the ‘middle-east.’ The threads I trace are through the gay Bear subculture in the U.S. and in countries like Turkey and Lebanon. I think we speak quite a bit about, perhaps too much, about the oppression of sexual minorities in middle east (which I think is very important)…without looking at or considering the native (queer) histories and discourses of sexuality in arab countries and how they are shifting in response to globalization. One of the central questions of my paper is about what kinds of conditions and interactions allow for the transfer for US gay subcultures, like Bears, to other countries/cultures?


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